How Much Does Google Cloud Hosting Cost

Google Cloud

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With Google Cloud, Google offers a product that competes with the market leader Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Similar to AWS, various cloud services are offered, including virtual servers that can be put into operation as required. The resources in terms of CPU, RAM and hard disk can be scaled relatively freely, and new vServers can also be put into operation within a few seconds. The billing takes place as required, i.e. only if the vServer is running must be paid.

The price model from Google is a little lighter than the price model from Amazon, but it is so complex that a price calculator is necessary to estimate the monthly costs.

Table of Contents

Google Cloud Conclusion

The services offered by Google are very extensive and therefore ideal for large users. For the small user who only wants to operate a virtual server, I consider Google Cloud (as well as AWS) to be not suitable. Because Google Cloud is expensive. And by expensive I mean very expensive. At Netcup, a vServer with 2 cores, 8 GB RAM and 40 GB SSD hard drive costs only about 7 euros per month. A similar VPS on Google Cloud (n1-standard-2) costs around 55 euros a month, around 8 times more than with Netcup.

Cloud hosting offers many advantages for large users who have to deliver terabytes of data across different data centers without failures and without long loading times to millions of users, similar to what Google has to manage with its numerous services.

Google Cloud's offerings are designed for this use case, so that more computing resources can be available within seconds. A new vServer can be started and put into operation within seconds. This is useful if individual servers fail or more capacity is required. Configuring this correctly, however, is complicated and many companies commission specialized providers to manage the cloud infrastructure.

Just understanding the individual limitations of Google Cloud and correctly configuring the services can be highly complex. For example, the hard drive speed is severely throttled and the throttling depends on the tariff booked. If you like, you can try to understand the help page: Google Compute Engine> Optimize persistent hard drive and local SSD performance.

Small users usually do not have to keep terabytes of data highly available and with short loading times. In this case, (traditional) vServer offers with fixed terms are the much better and cheaper deal.

Google Cloud Benchmark

As in the article Server benchmark using sysbench I have tested various VPS offers with regard to their performance. Standardized benchmarks were run on each vServer in order to improve the performance of the CPU, of RAMs and the hard disk to make comparable.

I tested the vServer n1-standard-1 at Google Cloud. This has 1 vCPU and 3.75 GB of RAM. The server was equipped with 20 GB of SSD hard disk storage. Cost at the time of the test: approx. 27 euros per month.

Benchmark result

CPU benchmark

The CPU benchmark searches for all prime numbers between 1 and 20,000, which requires 321,238 mathematical operations. This leads to a high utilization of the CPU:

sysbench --num-threads = 1 --test = cpu --cpu-max-prime = 20000 run

The Google Cloud VPS took 30.50 seconds for this test, which corresponds to 10533 operations per second and thus achieves the 3rd place. The CPU speed is -21% slower than the fastest offer in the test by Netcup.

The following table lists all providers according to the computing power of the CPU.
providersComputing power
Netcup
13305 operations / second (100%)
Amazon EC2
10754 operations / second (81%)
Google Cloud
10533 operations / second (79%)
1&1
10214 operations / second (77%)
Grid scale
10123 operations / second (76%)
Linevast
9828 operations / second (74%)
PHP friends
9519 operations / second (72%)
Hetzner
8923 operations / second (67%)
DomainFactory
7945 operations / second (60%)

RAM benchmark

The RAM benchmark measures the speed of the RAM when 100 GB of data is written to it:

sysbench --num-threads = 1 --test = memory --memory-block-size = 1M --memory-total-size = 100G run

The RAM speed of the Google Cloud VPS was on average 8.45 GB per second. Google Cloud thus achieves the 2nd place. The RAM speed is -3% slower than the fastest offer in the Amazon EC2 test.

The following table lists all providers according to the speed of the RAM.
providersR.A.M.
Amazon EC2
8.66 GB / sec (100%)
Google Cloud
8.45 GB / sec (97%)
Linevast
8.15 GB / sec (94%)
Netcup
7.90 GB / sec (91%)
1&1
7.75 GB / sec (89%)
Grid scale
7.70 GB / sec (89%)
PHP friends
7.35 GB / sec (85%)
Hetzner
7.17 GB / sec (83%)
DomainFactory
6.76 GB / sec (78%)

Hard drive benchmark

In the hard drive benchmark, sysbench accesses 1024 files with 10 MB each (i.e. a total of 10 GB of data). These files are read out randomly and overwritten at a ratio of 1.5 to 1. From this, an average read and write speed is calculated.

# Run commands as root sysbench --test = fileio --file-total-size = 10G --file-num = 1024 prepare ulimit -n 65000 sysbench --num-threads = 1 --test = fileio --file-total -size = 10G --file-num = 1024 --file-test-mode = rndrw --max-time = 300 --max-requests = 0 --file-extra-flags = direct --file-fsync-freq = 1 run

The Google Cloud VPS could on average 1.23 MB per second read or write from the hard disk. Google Cloud thus achieves the 7th place. The hard disk speed is thus -94% slower than the fastest offer in the Netcup test.

The following table lists all providers according to the speed of the hard disk.
providersAverage read & write speed
Netcup
20.36 MB / s (100%)
1&1
18.86 MB / s (93%)
Linevast
15.34 MB / s (75%)
Amazon EC2
11.94 MB / s (59%)
DomainFactory
11.54 MB / s (57%)
PHP friends
6.86 MB / s (34%)
Google Cloud
1.23 MB / s (6%)
Grid scale
0.88 MB / s (4%)
Hetzner
0.39 MB / s (2%)

Sequential read / write

In the sequential hard drive benchmark, we write a 10 GB file to the hard drive and then read it out. In contrast to the previous test, this measures performance for read / write operations of large files.

dd if = / dev / zero of =. / test.file bs = 1M count = 10000 oflag = direct dd if =. / test.file of = / dev / null bs = 1M count = 10000

The Google Cloud VPS could on average 28.0 MB per second read from the hard drive and 28.0 MB per second write to the hard disk. Google Cloud thus achieves the 9th place regarding the reading speed and the 9th place regarding the writing speed.

The following table lists all providers according to the sequential read speed of the hard disk.
providersRead speed (large files)
DomainFactory
778.0 MB / s (100%)
Netcup
740.2 MB / s (95%)
Linevast
405.0 MB / s (52%)
1&1
227.0 MB / s (29%)
Hetzner
176.0 MB / s (23%)
PHP friends
127.3 MB / s (16%)
Grid scale
106.0 MB / s (14%)
Amazon EC2
64.4 MB / s (8%)
Google Cloud
28.0 MB / s (4%)
The following table lists all providers according to the sequential write speed of the hard disk.
providersWrite speed (large files)
Netcup
665.2 MB / s (100%)
Linevast
425.0 MB / s (64%)
DomainFactory
404.0 MB / s (61%)
Hetzner
343.0 MB / s (52%)
1&1
304.0 MB / s (46%)
PHP friends
187.7 MB / s (28%)
Grid scale
106.0 MB / s (16%)
Amazon EC2
64.4 MB / s (10%)
Google Cloud
28.0 MB / s (4%)

The hard drive speed on Google Cloud is severely throttled. In the test above, I already chose the fastest type of hard drive: Local SSD hard drives. Nevertheless, the VPS only achieved a speed of 1.2 MB per second for random read / write in the benchmark. Even with sequential writing and sequential reading of larger files, the performance is not much better. There the VPS reached just 28 MB per second, slower than some Internet connections.

Certainly you can also book faster hard drives with Google Cloud, but for this you would have to understand the FAQ article from Google to know how faster hard drive space can be used. And as usual with cloud hosting providers, less throttled disk space is more expensive.